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Maximizing the Mini-Fridge

Maximizing the Mini-Fridge


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Whether you’re stocking up to maximize efficiency for a hell week of exams or you can’t bear the thought of stepping outside your heated dorm to trek through the snow for food, there are times when you need that mini-fridge to reach it’s full potential. Most make an attempt to shove in as many items until it exceeds capacity and just hope their roommate will experience the avalanche of falling food before they do. When cramming in another Vitamin Water seems futile, you can utilize some strategic maneuvers to accomplish the job.

While maximizing this finite amount of cold space, the freezer is often overlooked as a means to keep things fresh. You can go all out on frozen boxes of breakfast muffins and soft pretzels that stack two-tall without the worry of an impending expiration date.

Trying to fend off the freshman fifteen? Storing fruits in the freezer will allow these perishables to remain edible for longer in order to power you through a busy week or keep your immune system up after a sleep-deprived weekend of THON.

Photo by Sophie Najjar

As for the available space in the refrigerator section, there are tactics that come with each storage compartment inside. Try to keep the unhealthy items, ranging from pudding cups to energy drinks, to a minimum by only storing them in the tiny rows along the door.

Even that drawer that never seems to open all the way and you suspect to be lined with a suspicious sticky fluid can still be used to your advantage by providing a home for larger fruits (like bunches of grapes), jugs of orange juice, or cups of yogurt.

Then to the renowned top shelf, where the potential for storage seems limitless in perspective. This area is ideal for leftover Styrofoam containers of LateNight, bottles of water, and sandwiches for the next day. Although the enigma of storing food in a tiny dorm fridge may seem daunting and at times startlingly resemble an unbeatable level of Tetris, maximum storage capacity can be achieved with these tips. Happy Hunger Games!

The post Maximizing the Mini-Fridge originally appeared on Spoon University. Please visit Spoon University to see more posts like this one.


How to Organize Your Refrigerator for Better Food Storage | The Food Lab

Like cell phones and clean underwear, a refrigerator is one of those things that you never really consider the importance of until it stops doing its job (like mine did last week).* Organizing your fridge for maximum efficiency—in terms of food shelf life, food safety, and easy access to the things you reach for most—should be a top priority. It'll make all of your cooking projects go faster and more easily, and having more fun in the kitchen inevitably leads to more cooking. That's a good thing in my book.

*The fridge, not the underwear.

A fridge is basically just a big, cold box with a few shelves in it, right? Well, that's true, but where you store food in the fridge can have quite an impact on its shelf life. Most refrigerators have cold and hot spots, with temperatures that range from 33 to 38°F (0.5 to 3°C) or so. In general, the back of the bottom shelf, where cooler, heavier air falls to, and the back of the top shelf, closest to the fan and condenser, are the coldest spots, while the middle of the door is the warmest. How you organize your food in the fridge should be based on how cold it needs to be kept.

First, some basic tips on getting the most out of your fridge space on a daily basis:

  • Get a fridge thermometer. There are a number of things that can cause your fridge to break down or lose power: electrical shorts or surges, clogged ventilation, et cetera. So it's possible that even with your temperature dial adjusted to the correct position, your fridge might be far warmer than it should be. A simple dial thermometer—like this cheap one from Rubbermaid—helps you monitor things to ensure that you're never caught in the dark.
  • Transfer food to smaller containers. I keep a stack of pint and quart plastic deli containers (available on Amazon) to store almost all food once it's come out of the original packaging. Air is the enemy of most foods and can increase their rate of spoilage. By transferring them to smaller containers, you not only minimize air contact, but you also help keep your fridge organized and easy to navigate.
  • Label everything. As soon as you transfer food into a smaller storage container, label the container, using permanent marker on masking tape, with the date of storage as well as what's inside. As much as I promote good science, there are some things that simply aren't worth experimenting with creating life inside your refrigerator is one of them.
  • Prevent drippage. To avoid messes and dangerous cross-contamination, always store raw meat—no matter how well wrapped—on a plate or tray to catch any drips.
  • Keep fish extra cold. It's best to use fresh fish immediately, but if you must store it, wrap it in plastic, and sandwich it between two ice packs on a tray to ensure that it stays at 32°F (0°C) or colder until ready to use. (Don't worry—because of dissolved solids in its cell structure, it won't freeze until well below 32°F.)

How to Organize Your Refrigerator for Better Food Storage | The Food Lab

Like cell phones and clean underwear, a refrigerator is one of those things that you never really consider the importance of until it stops doing its job (like mine did last week).* Organizing your fridge for maximum efficiency—in terms of food shelf life, food safety, and easy access to the things you reach for most—should be a top priority. It'll make all of your cooking projects go faster and more easily, and having more fun in the kitchen inevitably leads to more cooking. That's a good thing in my book.

*The fridge, not the underwear.

A fridge is basically just a big, cold box with a few shelves in it, right? Well, that's true, but where you store food in the fridge can have quite an impact on its shelf life. Most refrigerators have cold and hot spots, with temperatures that range from 33 to 38°F (0.5 to 3°C) or so. In general, the back of the bottom shelf, where cooler, heavier air falls to, and the back of the top shelf, closest to the fan and condenser, are the coldest spots, while the middle of the door is the warmest. How you organize your food in the fridge should be based on how cold it needs to be kept.

First, some basic tips on getting the most out of your fridge space on a daily basis:

  • Get a fridge thermometer. There are a number of things that can cause your fridge to break down or lose power: electrical shorts or surges, clogged ventilation, et cetera. So it's possible that even with your temperature dial adjusted to the correct position, your fridge might be far warmer than it should be. A simple dial thermometer—like this cheap one from Rubbermaid—helps you monitor things to ensure that you're never caught in the dark.
  • Transfer food to smaller containers. I keep a stack of pint and quart plastic deli containers (available on Amazon) to store almost all food once it's come out of the original packaging. Air is the enemy of most foods and can increase their rate of spoilage. By transferring them to smaller containers, you not only minimize air contact, but you also help keep your fridge organized and easy to navigate.
  • Label everything. As soon as you transfer food into a smaller storage container, label the container, using permanent marker on masking tape, with the date of storage as well as what's inside. As much as I promote good science, there are some things that simply aren't worth experimenting with creating life inside your refrigerator is one of them.
  • Prevent drippage. To avoid messes and dangerous cross-contamination, always store raw meat—no matter how well wrapped—on a plate or tray to catch any drips.
  • Keep fish extra cold. It's best to use fresh fish immediately, but if you must store it, wrap it in plastic, and sandwich it between two ice packs on a tray to ensure that it stays at 32°F (0°C) or colder until ready to use. (Don't worry—because of dissolved solids in its cell structure, it won't freeze until well below 32°F.)

How to Organize Your Refrigerator for Better Food Storage | The Food Lab

Like cell phones and clean underwear, a refrigerator is one of those things that you never really consider the importance of until it stops doing its job (like mine did last week).* Organizing your fridge for maximum efficiency—in terms of food shelf life, food safety, and easy access to the things you reach for most—should be a top priority. It'll make all of your cooking projects go faster and more easily, and having more fun in the kitchen inevitably leads to more cooking. That's a good thing in my book.

*The fridge, not the underwear.

A fridge is basically just a big, cold box with a few shelves in it, right? Well, that's true, but where you store food in the fridge can have quite an impact on its shelf life. Most refrigerators have cold and hot spots, with temperatures that range from 33 to 38°F (0.5 to 3°C) or so. In general, the back of the bottom shelf, where cooler, heavier air falls to, and the back of the top shelf, closest to the fan and condenser, are the coldest spots, while the middle of the door is the warmest. How you organize your food in the fridge should be based on how cold it needs to be kept.

First, some basic tips on getting the most out of your fridge space on a daily basis:

  • Get a fridge thermometer. There are a number of things that can cause your fridge to break down or lose power: electrical shorts or surges, clogged ventilation, et cetera. So it's possible that even with your temperature dial adjusted to the correct position, your fridge might be far warmer than it should be. A simple dial thermometer—like this cheap one from Rubbermaid—helps you monitor things to ensure that you're never caught in the dark.
  • Transfer food to smaller containers. I keep a stack of pint and quart plastic deli containers (available on Amazon) to store almost all food once it's come out of the original packaging. Air is the enemy of most foods and can increase their rate of spoilage. By transferring them to smaller containers, you not only minimize air contact, but you also help keep your fridge organized and easy to navigate.
  • Label everything. As soon as you transfer food into a smaller storage container, label the container, using permanent marker on masking tape, with the date of storage as well as what's inside. As much as I promote good science, there are some things that simply aren't worth experimenting with creating life inside your refrigerator is one of them.
  • Prevent drippage. To avoid messes and dangerous cross-contamination, always store raw meat—no matter how well wrapped—on a plate or tray to catch any drips.
  • Keep fish extra cold. It's best to use fresh fish immediately, but if you must store it, wrap it in plastic, and sandwich it between two ice packs on a tray to ensure that it stays at 32°F (0°C) or colder until ready to use. (Don't worry—because of dissolved solids in its cell structure, it won't freeze until well below 32°F.)

How to Organize Your Refrigerator for Better Food Storage | The Food Lab

Like cell phones and clean underwear, a refrigerator is one of those things that you never really consider the importance of until it stops doing its job (like mine did last week).* Organizing your fridge for maximum efficiency—in terms of food shelf life, food safety, and easy access to the things you reach for most—should be a top priority. It'll make all of your cooking projects go faster and more easily, and having more fun in the kitchen inevitably leads to more cooking. That's a good thing in my book.

*The fridge, not the underwear.

A fridge is basically just a big, cold box with a few shelves in it, right? Well, that's true, but where you store food in the fridge can have quite an impact on its shelf life. Most refrigerators have cold and hot spots, with temperatures that range from 33 to 38°F (0.5 to 3°C) or so. In general, the back of the bottom shelf, where cooler, heavier air falls to, and the back of the top shelf, closest to the fan and condenser, are the coldest spots, while the middle of the door is the warmest. How you organize your food in the fridge should be based on how cold it needs to be kept.

First, some basic tips on getting the most out of your fridge space on a daily basis:

  • Get a fridge thermometer. There are a number of things that can cause your fridge to break down or lose power: electrical shorts or surges, clogged ventilation, et cetera. So it's possible that even with your temperature dial adjusted to the correct position, your fridge might be far warmer than it should be. A simple dial thermometer—like this cheap one from Rubbermaid—helps you monitor things to ensure that you're never caught in the dark.
  • Transfer food to smaller containers. I keep a stack of pint and quart plastic deli containers (available on Amazon) to store almost all food once it's come out of the original packaging. Air is the enemy of most foods and can increase their rate of spoilage. By transferring them to smaller containers, you not only minimize air contact, but you also help keep your fridge organized and easy to navigate.
  • Label everything. As soon as you transfer food into a smaller storage container, label the container, using permanent marker on masking tape, with the date of storage as well as what's inside. As much as I promote good science, there are some things that simply aren't worth experimenting with creating life inside your refrigerator is one of them.
  • Prevent drippage. To avoid messes and dangerous cross-contamination, always store raw meat—no matter how well wrapped—on a plate or tray to catch any drips.
  • Keep fish extra cold. It's best to use fresh fish immediately, but if you must store it, wrap it in plastic, and sandwich it between two ice packs on a tray to ensure that it stays at 32°F (0°C) or colder until ready to use. (Don't worry—because of dissolved solids in its cell structure, it won't freeze until well below 32°F.)

How to Organize Your Refrigerator for Better Food Storage | The Food Lab

Like cell phones and clean underwear, a refrigerator is one of those things that you never really consider the importance of until it stops doing its job (like mine did last week).* Organizing your fridge for maximum efficiency—in terms of food shelf life, food safety, and easy access to the things you reach for most—should be a top priority. It'll make all of your cooking projects go faster and more easily, and having more fun in the kitchen inevitably leads to more cooking. That's a good thing in my book.

*The fridge, not the underwear.

A fridge is basically just a big, cold box with a few shelves in it, right? Well, that's true, but where you store food in the fridge can have quite an impact on its shelf life. Most refrigerators have cold and hot spots, with temperatures that range from 33 to 38°F (0.5 to 3°C) or so. In general, the back of the bottom shelf, where cooler, heavier air falls to, and the back of the top shelf, closest to the fan and condenser, are the coldest spots, while the middle of the door is the warmest. How you organize your food in the fridge should be based on how cold it needs to be kept.

First, some basic tips on getting the most out of your fridge space on a daily basis:

  • Get a fridge thermometer. There are a number of things that can cause your fridge to break down or lose power: electrical shorts or surges, clogged ventilation, et cetera. So it's possible that even with your temperature dial adjusted to the correct position, your fridge might be far warmer than it should be. A simple dial thermometer—like this cheap one from Rubbermaid—helps you monitor things to ensure that you're never caught in the dark.
  • Transfer food to smaller containers. I keep a stack of pint and quart plastic deli containers (available on Amazon) to store almost all food once it's come out of the original packaging. Air is the enemy of most foods and can increase their rate of spoilage. By transferring them to smaller containers, you not only minimize air contact, but you also help keep your fridge organized and easy to navigate.
  • Label everything. As soon as you transfer food into a smaller storage container, label the container, using permanent marker on masking tape, with the date of storage as well as what's inside. As much as I promote good science, there are some things that simply aren't worth experimenting with creating life inside your refrigerator is one of them.
  • Prevent drippage. To avoid messes and dangerous cross-contamination, always store raw meat—no matter how well wrapped—on a plate or tray to catch any drips.
  • Keep fish extra cold. It's best to use fresh fish immediately, but if you must store it, wrap it in plastic, and sandwich it between two ice packs on a tray to ensure that it stays at 32°F (0°C) or colder until ready to use. (Don't worry—because of dissolved solids in its cell structure, it won't freeze until well below 32°F.)

How to Organize Your Refrigerator for Better Food Storage | The Food Lab

Like cell phones and clean underwear, a refrigerator is one of those things that you never really consider the importance of until it stops doing its job (like mine did last week).* Organizing your fridge for maximum efficiency—in terms of food shelf life, food safety, and easy access to the things you reach for most—should be a top priority. It'll make all of your cooking projects go faster and more easily, and having more fun in the kitchen inevitably leads to more cooking. That's a good thing in my book.

*The fridge, not the underwear.

A fridge is basically just a big, cold box with a few shelves in it, right? Well, that's true, but where you store food in the fridge can have quite an impact on its shelf life. Most refrigerators have cold and hot spots, with temperatures that range from 33 to 38°F (0.5 to 3°C) or so. In general, the back of the bottom shelf, where cooler, heavier air falls to, and the back of the top shelf, closest to the fan and condenser, are the coldest spots, while the middle of the door is the warmest. How you organize your food in the fridge should be based on how cold it needs to be kept.

First, some basic tips on getting the most out of your fridge space on a daily basis:

  • Get a fridge thermometer. There are a number of things that can cause your fridge to break down or lose power: electrical shorts or surges, clogged ventilation, et cetera. So it's possible that even with your temperature dial adjusted to the correct position, your fridge might be far warmer than it should be. A simple dial thermometer—like this cheap one from Rubbermaid—helps you monitor things to ensure that you're never caught in the dark.
  • Transfer food to smaller containers. I keep a stack of pint and quart plastic deli containers (available on Amazon) to store almost all food once it's come out of the original packaging. Air is the enemy of most foods and can increase their rate of spoilage. By transferring them to smaller containers, you not only minimize air contact, but you also help keep your fridge organized and easy to navigate.
  • Label everything. As soon as you transfer food into a smaller storage container, label the container, using permanent marker on masking tape, with the date of storage as well as what's inside. As much as I promote good science, there are some things that simply aren't worth experimenting with creating life inside your refrigerator is one of them.
  • Prevent drippage. To avoid messes and dangerous cross-contamination, always store raw meat—no matter how well wrapped—on a plate or tray to catch any drips.
  • Keep fish extra cold. It's best to use fresh fish immediately, but if you must store it, wrap it in plastic, and sandwich it between two ice packs on a tray to ensure that it stays at 32°F (0°C) or colder until ready to use. (Don't worry—because of dissolved solids in its cell structure, it won't freeze until well below 32°F.)

How to Organize Your Refrigerator for Better Food Storage | The Food Lab

Like cell phones and clean underwear, a refrigerator is one of those things that you never really consider the importance of until it stops doing its job (like mine did last week).* Organizing your fridge for maximum efficiency—in terms of food shelf life, food safety, and easy access to the things you reach for most—should be a top priority. It'll make all of your cooking projects go faster and more easily, and having more fun in the kitchen inevitably leads to more cooking. That's a good thing in my book.

*The fridge, not the underwear.

A fridge is basically just a big, cold box with a few shelves in it, right? Well, that's true, but where you store food in the fridge can have quite an impact on its shelf life. Most refrigerators have cold and hot spots, with temperatures that range from 33 to 38°F (0.5 to 3°C) or so. In general, the back of the bottom shelf, where cooler, heavier air falls to, and the back of the top shelf, closest to the fan and condenser, are the coldest spots, while the middle of the door is the warmest. How you organize your food in the fridge should be based on how cold it needs to be kept.

First, some basic tips on getting the most out of your fridge space on a daily basis:

  • Get a fridge thermometer. There are a number of things that can cause your fridge to break down or lose power: electrical shorts or surges, clogged ventilation, et cetera. So it's possible that even with your temperature dial adjusted to the correct position, your fridge might be far warmer than it should be. A simple dial thermometer—like this cheap one from Rubbermaid—helps you monitor things to ensure that you're never caught in the dark.
  • Transfer food to smaller containers. I keep a stack of pint and quart plastic deli containers (available on Amazon) to store almost all food once it's come out of the original packaging. Air is the enemy of most foods and can increase their rate of spoilage. By transferring them to smaller containers, you not only minimize air contact, but you also help keep your fridge organized and easy to navigate.
  • Label everything. As soon as you transfer food into a smaller storage container, label the container, using permanent marker on masking tape, with the date of storage as well as what's inside. As much as I promote good science, there are some things that simply aren't worth experimenting with creating life inside your refrigerator is one of them.
  • Prevent drippage. To avoid messes and dangerous cross-contamination, always store raw meat—no matter how well wrapped—on a plate or tray to catch any drips.
  • Keep fish extra cold. It's best to use fresh fish immediately, but if you must store it, wrap it in plastic, and sandwich it between two ice packs on a tray to ensure that it stays at 32°F (0°C) or colder until ready to use. (Don't worry—because of dissolved solids in its cell structure, it won't freeze until well below 32°F.)

How to Organize Your Refrigerator for Better Food Storage | The Food Lab

Like cell phones and clean underwear, a refrigerator is one of those things that you never really consider the importance of until it stops doing its job (like mine did last week).* Organizing your fridge for maximum efficiency—in terms of food shelf life, food safety, and easy access to the things you reach for most—should be a top priority. It'll make all of your cooking projects go faster and more easily, and having more fun in the kitchen inevitably leads to more cooking. That's a good thing in my book.

*The fridge, not the underwear.

A fridge is basically just a big, cold box with a few shelves in it, right? Well, that's true, but where you store food in the fridge can have quite an impact on its shelf life. Most refrigerators have cold and hot spots, with temperatures that range from 33 to 38°F (0.5 to 3°C) or so. In general, the back of the bottom shelf, where cooler, heavier air falls to, and the back of the top shelf, closest to the fan and condenser, are the coldest spots, while the middle of the door is the warmest. How you organize your food in the fridge should be based on how cold it needs to be kept.

First, some basic tips on getting the most out of your fridge space on a daily basis:

  • Get a fridge thermometer. There are a number of things that can cause your fridge to break down or lose power: electrical shorts or surges, clogged ventilation, et cetera. So it's possible that even with your temperature dial adjusted to the correct position, your fridge might be far warmer than it should be. A simple dial thermometer—like this cheap one from Rubbermaid—helps you monitor things to ensure that you're never caught in the dark.
  • Transfer food to smaller containers. I keep a stack of pint and quart plastic deli containers (available on Amazon) to store almost all food once it's come out of the original packaging. Air is the enemy of most foods and can increase their rate of spoilage. By transferring them to smaller containers, you not only minimize air contact, but you also help keep your fridge organized and easy to navigate.
  • Label everything. As soon as you transfer food into a smaller storage container, label the container, using permanent marker on masking tape, with the date of storage as well as what's inside. As much as I promote good science, there are some things that simply aren't worth experimenting with creating life inside your refrigerator is one of them.
  • Prevent drippage. To avoid messes and dangerous cross-contamination, always store raw meat—no matter how well wrapped—on a plate or tray to catch any drips.
  • Keep fish extra cold. It's best to use fresh fish immediately, but if you must store it, wrap it in plastic, and sandwich it between two ice packs on a tray to ensure that it stays at 32°F (0°C) or colder until ready to use. (Don't worry—because of dissolved solids in its cell structure, it won't freeze until well below 32°F.)

How to Organize Your Refrigerator for Better Food Storage | The Food Lab

Like cell phones and clean underwear, a refrigerator is one of those things that you never really consider the importance of until it stops doing its job (like mine did last week).* Organizing your fridge for maximum efficiency—in terms of food shelf life, food safety, and easy access to the things you reach for most—should be a top priority. It'll make all of your cooking projects go faster and more easily, and having more fun in the kitchen inevitably leads to more cooking. That's a good thing in my book.

*The fridge, not the underwear.

A fridge is basically just a big, cold box with a few shelves in it, right? Well, that's true, but where you store food in the fridge can have quite an impact on its shelf life. Most refrigerators have cold and hot spots, with temperatures that range from 33 to 38°F (0.5 to 3°C) or so. In general, the back of the bottom shelf, where cooler, heavier air falls to, and the back of the top shelf, closest to the fan and condenser, are the coldest spots, while the middle of the door is the warmest. How you organize your food in the fridge should be based on how cold it needs to be kept.

First, some basic tips on getting the most out of your fridge space on a daily basis:

  • Get a fridge thermometer. There are a number of things that can cause your fridge to break down or lose power: electrical shorts or surges, clogged ventilation, et cetera. So it's possible that even with your temperature dial adjusted to the correct position, your fridge might be far warmer than it should be. A simple dial thermometer—like this cheap one from Rubbermaid—helps you monitor things to ensure that you're never caught in the dark.
  • Transfer food to smaller containers. I keep a stack of pint and quart plastic deli containers (available on Amazon) to store almost all food once it's come out of the original packaging. Air is the enemy of most foods and can increase their rate of spoilage. By transferring them to smaller containers, you not only minimize air contact, but you also help keep your fridge organized and easy to navigate.
  • Label everything. As soon as you transfer food into a smaller storage container, label the container, using permanent marker on masking tape, with the date of storage as well as what's inside. As much as I promote good science, there are some things that simply aren't worth experimenting with creating life inside your refrigerator is one of them.
  • Prevent drippage. To avoid messes and dangerous cross-contamination, always store raw meat—no matter how well wrapped—on a plate or tray to catch any drips.
  • Keep fish extra cold. It's best to use fresh fish immediately, but if you must store it, wrap it in plastic, and sandwich it between two ice packs on a tray to ensure that it stays at 32°F (0°C) or colder until ready to use. (Don't worry—because of dissolved solids in its cell structure, it won't freeze until well below 32°F.)

How to Organize Your Refrigerator for Better Food Storage | The Food Lab

Like cell phones and clean underwear, a refrigerator is one of those things that you never really consider the importance of until it stops doing its job (like mine did last week).* Organizing your fridge for maximum efficiency—in terms of food shelf life, food safety, and easy access to the things you reach for most—should be a top priority. It'll make all of your cooking projects go faster and more easily, and having more fun in the kitchen inevitably leads to more cooking. That's a good thing in my book.

*The fridge, not the underwear.

A fridge is basically just a big, cold box with a few shelves in it, right? Well, that's true, but where you store food in the fridge can have quite an impact on its shelf life. Most refrigerators have cold and hot spots, with temperatures that range from 33 to 38°F (0.5 to 3°C) or so. In general, the back of the bottom shelf, where cooler, heavier air falls to, and the back of the top shelf, closest to the fan and condenser, are the coldest spots, while the middle of the door is the warmest. How you organize your food in the fridge should be based on how cold it needs to be kept.

First, some basic tips on getting the most out of your fridge space on a daily basis:

  • Get a fridge thermometer. There are a number of things that can cause your fridge to break down or lose power: electrical shorts or surges, clogged ventilation, et cetera. So it's possible that even with your temperature dial adjusted to the correct position, your fridge might be far warmer than it should be. A simple dial thermometer—like this cheap one from Rubbermaid—helps you monitor things to ensure that you're never caught in the dark.
  • Transfer food to smaller containers. I keep a stack of pint and quart plastic deli containers (available on Amazon) to store almost all food once it's come out of the original packaging. Air is the enemy of most foods and can increase their rate of spoilage. By transferring them to smaller containers, you not only minimize air contact, but you also help keep your fridge organized and easy to navigate.
  • Label everything. As soon as you transfer food into a smaller storage container, label the container, using permanent marker on masking tape, with the date of storage as well as what's inside. As much as I promote good science, there are some things that simply aren't worth experimenting with creating life inside your refrigerator is one of them.
  • Prevent drippage. To avoid messes and dangerous cross-contamination, always store raw meat—no matter how well wrapped—on a plate or tray to catch any drips.
  • Keep fish extra cold. It's best to use fresh fish immediately, but if you must store it, wrap it in plastic, and sandwich it between two ice packs on a tray to ensure that it stays at 32°F (0°C) or colder until ready to use. (Don't worry—because of dissolved solids in its cell structure, it won't freeze until well below 32°F.)


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