Traditional recipes

Good Food: Choi’s Kimchi Co. White Napa Kimchi

Good Food: Choi’s Kimchi Co. White Napa Kimchi


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by Kate Malin

Kimchi, a traditional fermented Korean food, is both tasty and fantastically healthy. Packed with vitamins, low in calories, and full of probiotic bacteria that aid digestion and boost the immune system, it comes in hundreds of different varieties to suit every taste. At Choi’s Kimchi Co., run by mother and son duo Chong and Matt Choi, traditional types of kimchi are given personal touches using produce from local Oregon farms. After learning to make kimchi in her native South Korea, Chong continued the craft when she moved to the US and, with some help from her son, turned her talent into a business, quickly earning a reputation for excellence.

Classic kimchi can be too spicy for those not accustomed to the heat, so Choi’s White Napa cabbage kimchi, a 2016 Good Food Awards Finalist, is a perfect introduction to this wonderful family of fermented foods. It is tangy and tart but milder than most kimchi. Putting their own twist on tradition, Chong and Matt added in local carrots, red bell peppers, and Asian pears to complete a kimchi excellent for adding, condiment style, to noodles or sandwiches, or for using as an ingredient for cooking dishes like fried rice or savory pancakes.

Choi’s Kimchi Co. is a proud member of the Good Food Merchants Guild and a Finalist in this year’s Good Food Awards. The winners will be announced on January 15. Readers in the San Francisco area will have the chance to meet crafters, sample their products, and take home 80 of this year’s Winners by visiting the Good Food Awards Marketplace on Sunday, January 17. More information and tickets ($5) are available here. Choi’s Kimchi Co. White Napa Kimchi is available in stores across the country.

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From her grassroots work at the Good Food Awards to her continued education at NYU’s Food Studies Master’s Program, Kate Malin brings an unparalleled passion for great food and good people.

More Good Food Finds:


Let’s Talk Food: Making kimchi

The best words to describe kimchi are spicy, fermented and maybe even funky. Fermented means it is a probiotic, which is great for our gut.

Earlier this year, I had Tracy Kim on my &ldquoAudrey Wilson&rsquos Cooking Show&rdquo on NaLeo TV and she made kimchi. But unfortunately, she did not have a recipe written down &mdash everything was by her experience and eyeballing.

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So, in pursuit of a recipe, I found this one.

In 2016, Sunset magazine featured Chong and son Matt Choi&rsquos method of making kimchi. At that time, they were selling their kimchi at the downtown Portland, Ore., farmers market,

Choi&rsquos Kimchi Co. makes hand-crafted kimchi, making it in small batches in the same process that has been handed down from generation to generation. In 2011, they &ldquotook our first kimchi sample to the Portland Farmers Market and I strongly sensed that this was going to be a turning point in my life.&rdquo

Mrs. Choi remembers, &ldquoI love the vibrant atmosphere of the farmers market in downtown Portland, where there is an abundance of fresh produce, food, music and people enjoying life. I&rsquom always inspired by the farmers market and want to share my kimchi with this community that I adore. I often talked about starting a kimchi business. The farmers market was a perfect place to begin.

&ldquoTo me, kimchi is not just food. It represents my country, Korea. I make my kimchi with pride, knowing each batch contains the roots of my heritage.&rdquo

I love hearing about these success stories, as it was my dream to be able to help folks on the Big Island get started, perhaps first at farmers market, then get so successful they eventually go on to develop a viable, profitable business. That is why I started my nonprofit company and opened a certified kitchen to help new businesses start up.

I am delighted when a small business leaves us because they opened their own operation and are doing well, like when your children leave the house and become successful and happy!

The essential ingredient to making kimchi is gochugaru, or sun-dried red chiles, and coarse salt, such as kosher salt. Vegetables needed are Napa or Chinese cabbage and Korean daikons. When selecting the cabbage, look for green on the outside and yellow inside.

Choi&rsquos Napa Cabbage Kimchi

1 small head Napa cabbage (2 pounds)

4 ounces daikon radish (center section), peeled and sliced 1/4-inch thick, then cut into 1-inch pieces

1/4 cup coarse sea salt or kosher salt

1/4 cup ground Korean gochugaru chile

2 tablespoon minced yellow onion

5 medium garlic cloves, minced

1/2 teaspoon minced fresh ginger

1 1/2 teaspoon Thai or Vietnamese fish sauce (nam pla or nuoc nam)

1 green onion, white end halved lengthwise, then entire onion cut into 1 1/2-inch lengths

Quarter cabbage lengthwise. Cut out and discard the core at the base of each quarter, then slice cabbage crosswise into 2 1/2-inch pieces. Put cabbage in a large bowl, cover with water, and let sit for a minute.

Drain cabbage and return to the bowl. Add the daikon radish, sprinkle it with salt and toss with your hands to mix thoroughly.

Press down on vegetables to compact them, let sit at room temperature for 20 minutes. Stir to redistribute the salt and let vegetables sit uncovered at room temperature, 5-6 hours (no need to stir again).

Put vegetables in a large bowl of cold water and swish to rinse, then drain and repeat until it is as salty as you like.

Choi: &ldquoI change the water up to three times, tasting as I go to gauge saltiness. The thickest part of the cabbage won&rsquot taste salty and will have crunch, but the leafy part will be wilted and you&rsquoll taste a little salt.&rdquo

After the final draining, gently squeeze out most of the liquid and transfer vegetables to a large, clean, dry bowl. Peel, halve and core Asian pear.

Choi: &ldquoThe pear adds natural sweetness and is refreshing to the palate.&rdquo

Cut into 1/4-inch wide pieces (you should have about 3/4 cup).

Add pear to the bowl with all remaining ingredients except the green onion. Mix thoroughly, then gently mix in the green onion.

Choi: &ldquoMix the green onion in at the end so it doesn&rsquot bruise and looks nice.&rdquo

Pack kimchi into two clean 1-pint jars, leaving 1 1/2-inches of headspace below the rim. Push vegetables down firmly into the jars so the liquid within the jar rises.

Seal jars with a tight-fitting lid and let sit on a rimmed baking sheet at room temperature, away from direct sunlight. Fermentation time varies, but at warm room temperature, it should take 2-3 days. If it&rsquos cool, up to one week.

Sample the kimchi regularly (it might fizz a little when you open the jar, a sign that the fermentation is working). Open jars over the sink in case they drip.

Choi: &ldquoAs the kimchi ferments, more liquid will come out of the vegetables. Check the jars every day and push down on the kimchi to cause the juices to come up. This ferments the topmost part of the jar.&rdquo

When the kimchi is nicely tangy, it&rsquos ready to eat. It will keep, refrigerated, for up to three months.


Five PFM Vendors Win “2016 Good Food Award”

We like to take every opportunity to recognize our vendors and celebrate their accomplishments. Earlier this month, the sixth annual “Good Food Awards” released a list of 2016 winners, including five of our own PFM vendors, for their environmentally responsible methods of food production and superior product taste.

In a comprehensive review of 1,927 product entries nation-wide, only 242 companies were honored across 13 categories: beer, cider, charcuterie, cheese, chocolate, coffee, confections, honey, pickles, preserves, spirits, oil and pantry. Among the 13 categories, PFM vendors scored top honors in three separate categories: charcuterie, pickles and cheese.

Local favorite Olympia Provisions was among charcuterie category winners, with a Greek-inspired Rigani Loukaniko salami. Choi’s Kimchi Company delighted with both White Napa Kimchi & Napa Kimchi varieties. PFM was also well represented in the cheese category, including winners: American Heritage Dairy with a raw cow and sheep’s milk entitled “Isabella,” Goldin Artisan Goat Cheese with their renowned Chaumine, and Jacobs Creamery with a buttery cow’s cheese named “Bloomy.”

When asked what the “Good Food Award” meant to them, their brand, the food industry or local community:

“Winning this award tells me that I’m not only making a cheese people enjoy but also making it in a sustainable way that’s good for the environment. I make cheese because I enjoy making people happy, and this tells me I’m on the right path!” – Jacobs Creamery

“The Good Food Award means many things for us at Choi’s Kimchi Co. From the blind taste testing to the vetting process, it give us validation that the quality of our products and process we stand by are of the highest quality that we set out to achieve when we first started at the Portland Farmers Market in 2011. To our brand this award gives us exposure to a wider audience. To the food industry it sends a message that the food we consume, and the way that it’s produced truly do matter to people. To our community here in Portland just as much as you appreciate us for making the food you enjoy, we truly appreciate everyone for supporting us and molding and shaping us into what we are and what we will become in the future. We absolutely could not be here without you all.” -Choi’s Kimchi Company

You can learn more about each vendor’s winning product on their website, or during a visit to the Portland Farmer’s Market!

Congratulations again, to our hard-working vendors–you’re welcome at our table any time!


Shake Shack’s fried chicken sandwich boasts authentic Korean roots

When Shake Shack opened its first South Korea location in 2016, Culinary Director Mark Rosati and his team did what food industry folks love to do—they packed in as many restaurant visits as they could while there.

“We discovered many variations of Korean fried chicken,” Rosati remembers. “All use the same technique of double frying the chicken, but each restaurant owner uses a unique sauce.”

After taste-testing numerous versions over several years, the Korean fried chicken coated with a gochujang glaze at a Seoul beer hall was the one that stood out, says Rosati. So when the team began R&D on a Shake Shack version, a gochujang glaze was a must-have component.

Working with their Shake Shack partners in Seoul, the team began developing a Korean-style Fried Chick’n sandwich about two years ago. It launched in the chain’s South Korean units in Oct. 2020, and, with a few tweaks, debuted in U.S. locations earlier this month.

Starting with the chicken

The foundation of the new sandwich is Shake Shack’s Chick’n Shack, which uses a fresh, boneless chicken breast slow-cooked sous-vide style in buttermilk to tenderize the meat. “We have a huge fan base for the Chick’n Shack, so we started there,” says Rosati. The chicken is breaded and fried to order at each location.

Next, the teams honed in on the gochujang glaze. The goal was to create a spicy-sweet glaze from scratch that could be scaled up. The final glaze is a blend of gochujang sauce, rice syrup, garlic and ginger. “We’re fanatical about flavors and colors and the chopped ginger and garlic add another dimension,” says Rosati. Toasted sesame seeds finish off the chicken prep.

In South Korea, the glazed fried chicken is served on the classic Shake Shack potato roll with a side of pickled white radish.

Tweaking the build for the American market

After running the sandwich in 14 South Korean Shake Shack locations with very positive customer feedback, Rosati said, “Why not bring it here?”

To begin, he tapped one of the chain’s co-packing partners to scale up the gochujang glaze recipe to supply a consistent product throughout the U.S. system.

Rosati felt that the sandwich needed something cool to contrast with the heat of the glaze, so instead of serving a side of pickled white radish, his team developed a white kimchi slaw to layer on top of the chicken. In keeping with Shake Shack’s mission to partner with small, local producers, the kimchi is made in an authentic style by a Portland, Ore. company with Korean owners, Choi's Kimchi. It’s a proprietary combo of fermented napa cabbage , daikon radish, carrots, garlic, Asian pear and green onion made expressly for Shake Shack.

“We get the kimchi in at each location and mix the slaw in house,” says Rosati.

The components create a sandwich that is “50% Shake Shack and 50% outside influence,” a balance he strives for when creating menu items. The kimchi, gochujang glaze and toasted sesame seeds are all new SKUs that were brought in for the limited-time offer.

Adapting a fine-dining mindset to fast casual

Originally part of Danny Meyer’s Union Square Hospitality group of restaurants, “fine dining is ingrained in Shake Shack’s DNA,” says Rosati. That means a focus on cooking everything fresh in-house with chef-created recipes and techniques. But sometimes, “we have to take our chef egos out of the equation” to simplify processes in a fast-casual setting, he adds.

The biggest challenge with the new sandwich was finding an efficient way to glaze the fried chicken. “We originally poured it into one big pot but it was awkward. The operations team found a clever solution that was easier on team members,” says Rosati. Instead, it’s poured into smaller pans that fit onto each station. The prep crew uses tongs to dip the fried chicken into the glaze, then sprinkle on the sesame seeds.

The limited-time Korean-style Fried Chick’n sandwich sells for $7.19 and is part of a group of Korean-influenced items that will run until Apr. 5. Also available are Korean-style Gochujang Chick’n Bites ($5.19 for 6-piece and $7.19 for 10-piece) and Korean-style Gochujang Fries ($3.49), all of which cross-utilize ingredients. For the fries, the gochujang glaze is blended with mayonnaise to create a dippable sauce.

Although Shake Shack had been working on its sandwich for many months, the launch just happened to coincide with the huge explosion of fried chicken sandwiches on chain menus. “If you’re a fan of fried chicken, you’re living in a good time,” Rosati notes.


5 Amazing Netflix Show With Roy Choi/Jon Favreau Stars
* * * * * Review Of Roy Choi&aposs The Chef Show
Yes, I am doing it again, I just can&apost help myself. I am sure there are those of you who already know about this cooking show on Netflix, The Chef Show. Somehow, I just discovered it and I am thrilled, happy, and blown away at how entertaining and informative it is all at the same time.

The trouble with some cooking shows is that you never feel as if you could do something like they are doing. or ma 5 Amazing Netflix Show With Roy Choi/Jon Favreau Stars
* * * * * Review Of Roy Choi's The Chef Show
Yes, I am doing it again, I just can't help myself. I am sure there are those of you who already know about this cooking show on Netflix, The Chef Show. Somehow, I just discovered it and I am thrilled, happy, and blown away at how entertaining and informative it is all at the same time.

The trouble with some cooking shows is that you never feel as if you could do something like they are doing. or maybe that's just me. But with this show, I love the way Roy and Jon and the visiting chefs interact and share their takes on life, how they cook, and the cooking of their specialties.

Roy and Jon met while doing the 2014 movie Chef. It can be seen in any number of ways, free at IMBTV. They bonded and in 2019 they did this show together. They invite chefs we may know of and together they recreate these dishes with all of them contributing. It is chatty and charming.

Because I have come late to the party, there are a bunch of 30minute episodes to make you as happy as me. Enjoy.

For more Reviews, Free E-books and Giveaways


Memoir/cookbook that I wished was fleshed out into two fuller, denser, and detailed books: one about Choi&aposs life and the other, a cookbook dedicated to his fusion cuisine. I&aposm a huge fan of the Kogi Truck and couldn&apost wait to read about his life before, during, and after Kogi launched the food truck craze. I was also looking forward to recipes from the man himself and found myself craving those Korean BBQ tacos that he made so famous over the years. What I got from L.A. Son was a bit 3.5 stars.

Memoir/cookbook that I wished was fleshed out into two fuller, denser, and detailed books: one about Choi's life and the other, a cookbook dedicated to his fusion cuisine. I'm a huge fan of the Kogi Truck and couldn't wait to read about his life before, during, and after Kogi launched the food truck craze. I was also looking forward to recipes from the man himself and found myself craving those Korean BBQ tacos that he made so famous over the years. What I got from L.A. Son was a bit of his life's story and some recipes, but not nearly enough of either.

I loved reading about Roy's life, but there seemed to be so much that was left out, glossed over, or just bypassed altogether. He (and his co-authors) present the story of a good-but-lost-kid-gone-bad-then-reborn in an entertaining style, but too many questions are left unanswered.

For example, there are numerous early references to his parents' growing alcoholism and the effect it had on his life, but it's never followed up or dealt with in a satisfying manner. I understand that these types of details might not jibe with the image he's trying to present, but I thought it would've made his story that much more fulfilling. Perhaps he was respecting his family's privacy? I understand that, but then I'd rather not read about these details in the first place. Like Chekov said, if there's a gun in the first chapter, then it better go off by the second or third chapter.

His relationship with his wife and the birth of his child seem like footnotes in the book. I'm sure it's not the case in real life, but these could've been handled much better than they were in the text. The stories about how food has influenced every part of his life are great and it was unfortunate that the authors decided to end the book right as Roy opens the Kogi Truck. There's nothing here about the phenomenal success he enjoyed or the ensuing food truck revolution in L.A. that spread throughout the country. It's a shame that we don't get anything more substantial from such an important figure of the new generation of cooking elite.

Still, I would recommend this to anyone who enjoys chef memoirs. For a book I just rated 3.5 stars, I enjoyed it immensely. It's a shame it's not a classic, but it's worth reading. . more

I liked reading about Roy quite a bit. He&aposs definitely had a colorful life and the way he keeps overcoming the bumps on his road is inspiring. Much of the history and events between the highs and lows are left untold, leaving the reader to fill in the details. However, you can&apost help but root for him, as he is charming and seems to be a good guy.

The recipes are beautifully photographed and some of them are likely worth a try. However, definitely read carefully, as you get the sense that just as I liked reading about Roy quite a bit. He's definitely had a colorful life and the way he keeps overcoming the bumps on his road is inspiring. Much of the history and events between the highs and lows are left untold, leaving the reader to fill in the details. However, you can't help but root for him, as he is charming and seems to be a good guy.

The recipes are beautifully photographed and some of them are likely worth a try. However, definitely read carefully, as you get the sense that just as no one proofread the final copy before publication (as we see by the many typos in multiple languages,) no one vetted the recipes completely, either. For example, the simple club sandwich. He emphasizes that "there is a science to a great club sandwich." Club sandwiches do not have cheese. I don't know why cheese was added and there is no explanation. Once the cheese is added, the sandwich ceases to be a club and is now a sub. So what science is he talking about?

Another example, the roasted mushrooms -- 1. Soak 8 ounces of mushrooms in a cup of olive oil. Yikes! I would not do that if I were you. Then as part of the ingredients, it lists more olive oil that is never mentioned in the steps. Hmmm. looks like someone messed up. No need to soak the mushrooms in a cup of olive oil and then discard the oil. For the record, that's a waste of good oil. Just sprinkle the oil over the mushrooms before you put the spices on. Done.

The recipes were chosen to fit the stories, not give you his culinary secrets that he saves for his restaurants. Understood. but definitely read through these recipes before you try. . more

The subtitle of this book is "My Life, My City, My Food," but the concept of the Korean taco sums up what it has to say.

This is THE book of contemporary America, and it shows that the story of America is exactly what we all thought.

Choi&aposs life is the American story of hard work, mess ups, opportunities, friends, family, and food. Choi, who writes with Nguyen and Phan (note these names), shows us all that what we read about in American history is still happenin&apos: people come here, they look and The subtitle of this book is "My Life, My City, My Food," but the concept of the Korean taco sums up what it has to say.

This is THE book of contemporary America, and it shows that the story of America is exactly what we all thought.

Choi's life is the American story of hard work, mess ups, opportunities, friends, family, and food. Choi, who writes with Nguyen and Phan (note these names), shows us all that what we read about in American history is still happenin': people come here, they look and listen, they try, they succeed, they fail, and it's all interesting and good. Sometimes the American Dream turns nightmarish, but you always have your wit and your hard work to rely on. You're entitled to nothing but what you can make of yourself.

The book is an ode to LA, too, a mosaic of cultures more diverse than anyone could imagine. (My own vision of L.A. is that of endless suburbs. Traveling with Choi, I realize that I am 'wayyy off base, and interestingly, his first real spiral is when he finds himself living in the O.C.).

And then there's the food. Street food. Hole in the wall food. Mother's food. Kimchi. Stew. Food you buy when you're rollin' with your friends. Food you buy when you have lots of money. Food you cook when you've graduated from the Culinary Institute of America. Food you fix at a resort hotel. Food you present in the best restaurant in Japan. Korean tacos.

Each chapter ends with recipes.

But. I wanted to know more about the food truck! Korean-American Choi lived life a bit before finding his true calling--and even it still took a firing and inability to find jobs to really find what he enjoyed doing.

I knew a little bit about the food truck craze and know that he played a part in it. So I thought this would be a great book to pick up. Part autobiography of his growing up, the son of Korean immigrants in Southern California (LA) and part-cookbook, we see Roy as he grows up, drif But. I wanted to know more about the food truck! Korean-American Choi lived life a bit before finding his true calling--and even it still took a firing and inability to find jobs to really find what he enjoyed doing.

I knew a little bit about the food truck craze and know that he played a part in it. So I thought this would be a great book to pick up. Part autobiography of his growing up, the son of Korean immigrants in Southern California (LA) and part-cookbook, we see Roy as he grows up, drifts from job to job, falls into a gambling debts and addiction, becomes a chef and climbs the ladder, gets fired from an Asian fusion start-up type deal and drifts again until the food truck idea comes along.

I didn't realize this book had recipes, which was not my thing. I've seen complaints from people that these don't seem to be the recipes in his restaurants or his offerings, but I could not say since I've never had his food. His story was really interesting to read, to see the son of immigrant parents (who also become alcoholics along the way it seems) grow up in a predominantly white area of LA and try to find himself after.

But I was a little bored after a while. His childhood and early adulthood were interesting, but his gambling and cooking jobs were not.I also got bored with some of the language used. I get that's just part of his background, but calling a dish "Pho for Dem H**" because it rhymes isn't particularly appealing.

And it was disappointing to see the book ended on a very perfunctory note about the food truck. Well, what about it? On Wikipedia he is mentioned as one of the "founders" of the food truck movement, but there's very little about it in this book. It seems to be an end to the means. What does it mean to be part of this movement? What do his parents (who bailed him out of his gambling addiction, who put up the money for him to go to the Culinary Institute of America in New York) think? He doesn't really talk about his personal life too much but I wanted to get a little bit more in his head about what it was like being an Asian male in what is a predominantly white (and likely male) business. Marcus Samuelsson who wrote Yes, Chef (and who is an Ethiopian adopted by a Swedish couple) discusses this a bit, which I found insightful and interesting and I wish Choi had done that too.

Honestly I got a lot more information from his Wikipedia page (that he volunteers and teaches children he volunteers with how to cook) and from David Sax's The Tastemakers regarding the food truck movement.

I didn't quite get what I was looking for from this book, but I'm not sure if I feel into marketing hype OR I didn't do enough research.I waited a LONG time for this book at the library (my local library system only bought one copy!) but it wasn't worth it. Better than buying it, I guess.

Some people will be interested in the recipes. Others may be interested in his background. But it's not a pure cookbook and it's not a pure autobiography either. If you want this or are interested, I really recommend you browse it at the library or bookstore first before deciding if you really want it. it's picture heavy (although it's not step by step cooking pics) and it looks and feels like a cookbook (heavy cover and pages).
. more

I read it for the recipes and was surprised by the story.

First, about the recipes. I think I want to own them. There are dozens I want to try, starting with kimchi and not ending wtih Gumbo, pounded pork schnitzel, and beef cheek tacos. Dunno about the cheek--I&aposll probably cheat on that. The kimchi is going to be weird enough--take a head of Napa cabbage and stuff between the leaves with fish sauce, shrimp, oysters, garlic, onion, and other stinky stuff let it ferment at room temperature for a I read it for the recipes and was surprised by the story.

First, about the recipes. I think I want to own them. There are dozens I want to try, starting with kimchi and not ending wtih Gumbo, pounded pork schnitzel, and beef cheek tacos. Dunno about the cheek--I'll probably cheat on that. The kimchi is going to be weird enough--take a head of Napa cabbage and stuff between the leaves with fish sauce, shrimp, oysters, garlic, onion, and other stinky stuff let it ferment at room temperature for a couple of days, then refrigerate for a few weeks. Maybe I'll see if I can buy a jar at the supermarket rather than risk poisoning myself. Plus I'm not sure if I can find kochukaru, ground Korean chili pepper. Maybe if I printed out the characters and went to an Asian grocery, comparing my printout to the labels, I could recognize some.

Second, the story. Mr. Choi's life is a classic story of, "How many times can a person go wrong and still turn out all right?" Growing up amid a cultural collision, he jumped on every time-wasting brain-draining bandwagon he encountered--drugs, fighting, drinking, gambling, and worst of all, banking! Yes, he spent a short eternity selling mutual funds.

(That previous paragraph isn't a spoiler--you know he gets to cooking in the end or this book would never have been written.)

You don't hear much about his personal life after the cooking starts, but I'll give him an okay on that one. He mentions this and apologizes and that's all right. We'll give him the privacy--he's told an awesome enough already. . more

If I could give half stars to a review, I would give this a 2.5.

Perhaps it is because "Fresh Off the Boat" was, well. fresh on my mind, and perhaps it&aposs unfair to compare one Asian-American chef memoir to another Asian-American chef memoir, but Roy Choi&aposs memoir left me with more questions than answers.

While Eddie Huang was able to layer insightful self-reflection with great food imagery and his own beginnings as a chef, Choi&aposs in comparison was just really lacking. There were no deeper dives If I could give half stars to a review, I would give this a 2.5.

Perhaps it is because "Fresh Off the Boat" was, well. fresh on my mind, and perhaps it's unfair to compare one Asian-American chef memoir to another Asian-American chef memoir, but Roy Choi's memoir left me with more questions than answers.

While Eddie Huang was able to layer insightful self-reflection with great food imagery and his own beginnings as a chef, Choi's in comparison was just really lacking. There were no deeper dives into race/identity/living in LA, we learn almost nothing (literally 3 pages on a Kindle) about Kogi or his life post-gambling problem. He spends a very long time writing about his downward spiral in gambling but we never see much of a redemption since the second half of the memoir is rushed from one event to another. He casually references that he gets married and a few chapters later, that he has a kid. Maybe they're not significant to his food-inspiration but talk about gliding over details!

The memoir--perhaps because the publisher/editor realized his story was lacking any depth--is sprinkled with recipes. Some of them are interesting, some of them are laughably unnecessary (roasting vegetables comes to mind. ), but none of them are cohesive save for the fact that they tangentially relate to his life (but I mean. does it. ).


Get it in the small size. Place in a large bowl and sprinkle salt evenly over cabbage leaves, lifting leaves to sprinkle salt in between leaves. Plate and something to weigh the kimchi down, like a jar or can of beans. And, because we are using miso paste, there is less salt than other kimchi … Ingredients: 1 Large Napa cabbage and 1 radish. Add the sliced radish, scallions, and red mustard greens to the rinsed cabbage. Can anyone suggest any other varieties of cabbage that could be used? Cut cabbage into 1" pieces and soak cabbage in the salt water for 3 to 4 hours. https://www.chatelaine.com/recipe/world-cuisine-2/napa-kimchee-recipe Clean 1-quart jar with canning lid or plastic lid. Today I will post the most common kimchi, “napa cabbage kimchi.” Kimchi is a dish of fermented vegetables with various seasonings. It originated out of the necessity of preserving vegetables for the long winters. Traditional Napa Cabbage Kimchi Kimchi is a a very popular Korean side dish eaten with meals or added to dishes for flavoring. 3. Napa Cabbage Kimchi. This recipe features basic traditional napa cabbage kimchi recipe. Instructions Checklist. https://www.foodblogph.com/recipes/napa-cabbage-kimchi-recipe ½ cup, plus 2 tablespoons sugar. 20 slices peeled fresh ginger, minced. Combine garlic, ginger, and fish sauce in food processor or blender until finely minced. Cut each quarter crosswise into 2-inch-wide strips. Spicy Napa Cabbage Kimchi [Vegan, Gluten Free, Non-GMO, Probiotic] by Choi's Kimchi Co. Made in USA. ½ cup gochugaru (Korean chili powder) ¼ cup fish sauce. 4 ounces daikon radish (center section), peeled and sliced 1/4 in. There are many different kinds of kimchi, and Koreans eat kimchi everyday. Instructions. Add the chopped scallions, the gochugaru mix, and 1 cup of water to the salted cabbage. Lucky Foods Seoul Kimchi (Pack of 1) Authentic Made to Order Korean Kimchi (Spicy Original, 28 oz) - … In a large bowl, combine the napa cabbage and bok choy. There is no fish-sauce used in the recipe which makes it vegan friendly. . Kimchi is a fermented dish, the more it ages the better it tastes, likewise with the sugar. Kimchi can be made out of any vegetables with the most popular being napa cabbage. Napa Cabbage Kimchi. Kimchi is a traditional fermented vegetable side dish from Korea. 20 garlic cloves, minced. However, we are unable to find any heirloom Napa cabbage seeds, so far. And Cho’s mother, Myung Ja Cho, still makes the restaurant’s napa cabbage kimchi, a staple on the restaurant’s famous menu of banchan, the … This is how they make it at Momofuku restaurants. To make the kimchi, start by slicing your Napa cabbage in half lengthwise. Let the cabbages sit in the bowl for about 6-8 hours. The recipe uses Napa cabbage as its primary vegetable to be picked and salted. Our homemade mix of premium Napa Cabbage with radish, apple, green onion, and garlic. 454g. To drain the cabbage: Rinse brined cabbage under cold water, place in a colander and let the water drain. There are even songs about kimchi such as “I Can’t Live Without Kimchi.” Moms love to have a good kimchi refrigerator. Napa Cabbage Kimchi. This is where people can get creative. Season with salt, or try my favorite classic sweet sour flavor: stir-fry 1 lb (500 g) cabbage with ½ tsp salt, 1 tbsp cornstarch, 1 tbsp sugar, and 1 tbsp dark rice vinegar. Press plastic wrap on the surface of the kimchi and put the caps on loosely. And thanks to the continued production of ceramic fermentation crocks , you can still make your fermented foods in the same traditional style that has been used for hundreds of years. It starts with salting the napa cabbage leaves one by one. Salting and seasoning a whole head of napa cabbage. From Momofuku by David Chang and Peter Meehan. It's a dish Koreans eat in practically every meal. Now it is a staple in everyday Korean and other Asian households. Napa Cabbage Kimchi. In large bowl, combine radish, green onions, garlic, fish sauce, (Korean chili powder) red pepper flakes and cayenne. Add kimchi on top of the cheese. Quarter Napa cabbage lengthwise. Slice the cabbage: Cut the cabbage lengthwise into quarters and remove the cores. Don’t overcook the leaves, just fry the thicker white ribs first for about 2 minutes, then add the leaves and fry another 2 minutes. Store in the refrigerator. Whether you're having breakfast, lunch, or dinner, kimchi accompanies or is the key ingredient in countless dishes. Napa cabbage kimchi is the only kind we have attempted at home. Many Koreans think that a meal is not complete without kimchi. Napa Cabbage Kimchi and other fermented foods have seen a huge surge in popularity thanks to recent research on the health benefits of probiotics for digestive health, among other areas. Bowl or plate to place under jar during fermentation. Cabbage Kimchi is seen as the most widely consumed kimchi across the fore. To finish the kimchi: Place the rinsed cabbage in a large mixing bowl. pieces (3/4 cup) 1/4 cup coarse sea salt. Heat the griddle or a skillet over med-low heat. 1 small head napa cabbage (2 lbs.) Let stand at room temperature for 3 days, until the cabbage is tangy and bubbling. Beet Kimchi. Cabbage Kimchi and Radish Kimchi. See Retailers. Mix the chili pepper flakes (gochugaru), saeujeot, sugar, garlic, and ginger with 1/2 cup of water. Cover and leave overnight (6 to 8 hours). ¼ cup soy … Repeat once more. https://www.allrecipes.com/recipe/105179/spicy-cabbage-kimchi Optional 1 carrot (julienned) Step 1. $19.99. thick, then cut into 1-in. Cook until the bottom of the bread is toasted golden brown. Be sure to rinse the cabbage in cool water after salting. Colander. Generously butter two slices of bread on one side and place them butter side down on the griddle/skillet. I’m sure there are many methods for slicing up a Napa cabbage, but this is how I like to do it. Save. Baek Kimchi is a delicious non-spicy pickled napa cabbage Baek means “white, “ and Kimchi means “fermented vegetable”. Drain and rinse cabbage … loading. X. Cut out the core at the bottom of the cabbage. Use a persimmon in place of the apple, if you prefer. It is the one I use when I teach my workshops. If you want to serve it the very next day, don't refrigerate. Radishes are a bonus, and carrots add to the texture and color of the concoction. Using a kitchen glove, mix everything well by hand until the cabbage pieces are … 4.4 out of 5 stars 610 # 1 Best Seller in Pickled Mixed Vegetables. 5 … Allrecipes has more than 30 trusted napa cabbage recipes complete with ratings, reviews and cooking tips. Small bowl. Leave the cabbage until the leaves have wilted and become soft, but still retain the crunch. 1/4 Asian pear. It has a very rich and fresh taste that will boost up your appetit It's thrown into soups, stews, stir fries, Korean pancakes, noodles, rice rolls, and so much more. 1/2 cup napa cabbage kimchi, coarsely chopped Directions. 2 tablespoons minced yellow onion. Ingredients. Ingredients: 1 small to medium head Napa cabbage 2 tablespoons kosher salt ½ cup, plus 2 tablespoons sugar, divided 20 garlic cloves, minced 20 slices peeled fresh ginger, minced Traditional Kimchi Recipe (Napa Cabbage Kimchi) koreanbapsang.com Colleen Volcjak. It's spicy, salty, slight sweet, and is believed to be good for gut health and digestion. Adjust the seasoning. Try our new flavour - Beet Kimchi. The process isn’t difficult but it is labor intensive. 100% Imported from Korea 한국 배추 김치 100% Imported from Korea Korean Cabbage Kimchi The Kimchi in Seoul Recipe is purely made with ingredients imported from Korea. 1/4 cup ground Korean chile (gochugaru)*. Rotate the cabbages every few hours. This is a super easy kimchi recipe that I’ve been making for years. Among other things, I'm looking forward to making my own kimchi, possibly even in a crock pot underground. Fermented Food. Napa cabbage is the main ingredient in traditional kimchi.You can find it in almost any grocery store and in farmers’ markets, although the cabbages sold at a Korean grocery store are always cheaper, bigger, and better tasting. It’s said that every Korean home makes kimchi a little differently. Making sure to bring the bottom cabbages to the top, and top cabbages to the bottom, and vise versa. Make cuts along the length of the cabbage that are about 1 1/2 inches wide. Korean Bottled Kimchi, Original Authentic Tasteful Bottle Napa Cabbage Kimchi, Vegan Gluten Free [No Preservatives] - 7.58 oz (1 Bottle) Brand: Wang 3.9 out of 5 stars 371 ratings Let cabbage stand for 10-15 minutes until all water has drained off. 2 tablespoons kosher salt. Half Gallon (3.5 lbs.) Made with fresh beets, daikon, onion, and garlic. Baek Kimchi is full of flavor, stuffed with colorful vegetables, and healthy ingredients without the spicy red chili peppers people often associate with kimchi. From the napa cabbage to all the spices and paste for salting and fermenting the vegetables. Rinse under running water and drain. I refuse to give up on my Kimchi dream, and my wife won't budge on her all-heirloom dream. 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Thursday, November 30, 2017

Squash Sagra: Get Your Squash On This Weekend!

  1. When was the last time you ate squash? How was it prepared?
  2. When was the last time you bought a whole squash?
  3. How many varieties can you name (besides acorn and butternut)?

The Sagra—local festival in Italian—is free and open to the public in conjunction with the annual Fill Your Pantry event hosted by Friends of Family Farmers. Local chefs will be handing out samples of squash dishes they've prepared, sharing recipes and discussing flavors and culinary uses of the diverse varieties of squash grown locally. Farmers will be offering a wide array of vegetables, beans and grains for purchase on-site, so there'll be something for everyone.

You'll also have the opportunity to learn about the four categories of squash: sweet squash perfect for desserts, baked goods and pastries simple squash that can be baked or steamed with no added ingredients salad squash with their excellent flavor and texture when eaten raw and saucy squash that are ideal for sauces, soups or curries. (See the Eat Winter Squash website for more info and photos.)

There'll be a squash butchery booth where chef Tim Wastell will share pro tips and techniques for cutting up and storing the larger squash varieties. Uprising Seeds, Washington state's first 100% organic seed company, will be demonstrating a European seed oil press to make your own seed oils. There'll be a kids' play area for younger folk to taste samples of these delectable cucurbits and learn about how squash grow. And of course there's the ubiquitous Photo Booth where you can cuddle up to the cucurbit of your choice and take home a photo that'll prove your love.

"I've been wanting to do a sagra like this for a long time," said Lane Selman of the Culinary Breeding Network, one of the sponsors of the sagra. "Hopefully people will get really inspired and learn a lot about the different categories of squash that are grown in our area."

Get my recipes for squash soup, squash pie and squash risotto. Even squash sorbet (it's delicious, I promise)!

Top photo by Shawn Linehan featuring Lane Selman of the Culinary Breeding Network admiring a Doran Round Butternut squash from Adaptive Seeds Farm.


We found at least 10 Websites Listing below when search with napa cabbage kimchi recipe on Search Engine

Traditional Kimchi Recipe (Napa Cabbage Kimchi)

  • Kimchi is a good source of useful lactic acid bacteria, has excellent anti-oxidation and anti-cancer effects, and helps prevent aging
  • This kimchi recipe is made with baechu (배추), known as napa cabbage, hence the name baechu kimchi
  • Because the cabbage is kept intact at its head, it’s also known as pogi kimchi

Easy Napa Cabbage Kimchi (Kimchee) Recipe

Chowhound.com DA: 17 PA: 47 MOZ Rank: 65

  • 1 Cut the cabbage in half lengthwise, then crosswise into 2-inch pieces, discarding the root end
  • Place in a large bowl, sprinkle with the salt, and toss with your hands until the cabbage is coated
  • Add enough cold water to just cover (about 12 cups), making sure the cabbage

Traditional napa cabbage kimchi recipe

Maangchi.com DA: 16 PA: 25 MOZ Rank: 43

Made with: Asian chives, carrot, fermented salted shrimp, fish sauce, garlic, ginger, green onion, hot pepper flakes, Korean radish, kosher salt, minari, napa cabbage, onion, sugar, sweet rice flour, Turbinado sugar, water, This recipe

Napa Cabbage Kimchi Martha Stewart

  • In a large bowl, toss cabbage with salt and 2 tablespoons sugar
  • Transfer to refrigerator and let stand overnight
  • Step 2 In a large bowl, combine garlic, ginger, kochukaru, fish sauce, …

Choi's Napa Cabbage Kimchi Recipe

Sunset.com DA: 14 PA: 33 MOZ Rank: 51

  • 1 small head napa cabbage (2 lbs.) 4 ounces daikon radish (center section), peeled and sliced 1/4 in

Kimchi Recipe, Spicy Pickled Napa Cabbage Crazy Korean

  • Kimchi is a must-have side dish that appears in almost every Korean meal
  • "Kimchi" is the generic Korean name for pickled vegetables
  • When Koreans say "kimchi," they usually refer to spicy napa cabbage kimchi, since napa cabbage is the most common vegetable used in making kimchi.

Easy Napa Cabbage Korean Kimchi

  • Rinse salted Napa cabbage in cold water 2 to 3 times in a colander bowl and let the water drain. Rinse and cut green onions about 1-inch length
  • Mix your green onions, rinsed Napa cabbage, and blended spicy mixture in a large bowl

Basic Napa Cabbage Kimchi (Kimchee)

Chowhound.com DA: 17 PA: 50 MOZ Rank: 74

  • Basic Napa Cabbage Kimchi (Kimchee) Making your own kimchi is as simple as chopping, mixing, and waiting
  • Kimchi is a traditional Korean dish of fermented vegetables, the most common of which are napa cabbage and daikon radish (but check out other types of kimchi)

Yangbaechu Kimchi (Green Cabbage Kimchi)

  • Great for kimchi beginners, this yangbaechu kimchi recipe is a good alternative if you can’t find napa cabbages at your local groceries or need a quick kimchi
  • The Korean name for green cabbage, yangbaechu, actually means Western cabbage.

Traditional Napa Cabbage Kimchi recipe Epicurious.com

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  • Soak cabbage in the salt water for 3 to 4 hours
  • Combine garlic, ginger, and fish sauce or shrimp in food processor or blender until finely minced

A Quick & Easy Napa Cabbage Kimchi Recipe Humble House

Humblehouse.co DA: 14 PA: 45 MOZ Rank: 69

  • Napa Cabbage Kimchi can be eaten on its own or together with other foods, like rice and meat dishes! RECIPE INSTRUCTIONS
  • Cut the cabbage into quarters lengthwise, then trim out and discard the core
  • Next, cut the cabbage crosswise into 2-inch-wide strips and place them in a large bowl with the salt.

Traditional Napa Cabbage Kimchi Recipe

  • Traditional Napa Cabbage Kimchi Recipe Ingredients like garlic, ginger, and chili flakes combine with cabbage and radish to make the classic dish known as Kimchi
  • Kimchi is a traditional Korean dish that dates back to over 3,000 years ago.

Authentic Korean Napa Cabbage Kimchi Recipe — Vietnamese

Vickypham.com DA: 17 PA: 49 MOZ Rank: 78

  • 7 lbs napa cabbage (3 to 4 large heads) 1/2 cup salt
  • 2 tablespoons sweet rice flour (glutinous rice) 2 tablespoons brown sugar
  • 3 heads garlic (peel) 1/2 inch piece ginger (slice across the grain into small coins)

Super Easy Vegan Napa Cabbage Kimchi

  • Ingredients Cut napa cabbage into quarter, remove its cord, and cut each quarter into chunk about 1-2 inches
  • Place the cabbage into a big bowl and add ½ cup of sea salt (you may need 1 cup of water, too) and massage into the cabbage
  • Then leave it for at least 2 hours or until your cabbage

Traditional Napa Cabbage Kimchi Recipe

Foodandwine.com DA: 19 PA: 40 MOZ Rank: 73

  • Add the daikon and scallions to the cabbage and toss
  • Add the garlic mixture and the red pepper powder and toss thoroughly
  • Pack the cabbage into three 1-quart jars

Baechu Kimchi (Napa Cabbage Kimchi) Recipe

Seriouseats.com DA: 19 PA: 22 MOZ Rank: 56

  • Baechu kimchi, the ubiquitous kimchi made from Napa cabbage, is the spicy, fermented heart of Korean cuisine
  • It’s enjoyed in a multitude of ways, whether eaten fresh as an accompaniment to bossam or Korean barbecue, as the perfect topping for ramyun noodles , as an excellent mix-in for fried rice , or as the star, as in kimchi jeon.

Napa Cabbage Kimchi recipe Epicurious.com

Epicurious.com DA: 18 PA: 46 MOZ Rank: 80

  • Coarsely chop the cabbage into 1-inch pieces
  • Dissolve 3/4 cup of salt in 2 cups of water and pour over the cabbage
  • Use your hand to mix it in evenly.

Homemade Napa Cabbage and Daikon Kimchi

  • Once your cabbage is ready, rinse it well under cold water, making sure to squeeze all the water and a big part of the salt out
  • Then, let it sit for 20 minutes, over the sink, in a strainer
  • Place the cabbage in a mixing bowl, add the sliced daikon and green onions to the bowl.

Napa Cabbage Kimchi – Momofuku Peachy Keen

  • Cut the cabbage lengthwise in half, then cut the halves crosswise into 1-inch-wide pieces
  • Toss the cabbage with the salt and 2 tablespoons of the sugar in a bowl
  • Let sit overnight in the refrigerator
  • Combine the garlic, ginger, gochugaru, fish sauce, soy sauce, and remaining ½ cup sugar in a large bowl.

Easy Vegan Napa Cabbage Kimchi (Mak Kimchi) Recipe

  • Place 1 heaping TBS (around 0.1oz) of dried seaweed (miyeok/wakame) in a bowl and soak in water for around 15-20 minutes till it expands and softens
  • Then, drain water and chop into small pieces so it blends more easily
  • In a food processor or blender, add seaweed, onion, garlic, ginger, soy …

Korean Vegan Kimchi With Napa Cabbage, Baechu Pogi Kimchi

  • Prep, cut and brine napa cabbage for 6-8 hours and radish big chunks for 1 hour
  • Bring 4 cups of water to boil and add dry kelp

Napa Cabbage Kimchi With Steamed Pork Belly Recipe

During gimjang, the annual Korean kimchi-making gathering, it's customary to set aside a portion of the seasoned cabbage to eat fresh with steamed pork belly, after everything else has been put up for the year This recipe from Julya Shin and Steve Joo of Oakland's Nokni restaurant yields a savory, pungent kimchi

Green Cabbage Kimchi Recipe Beyond Kimchee

  • Green cabbage is a great substitution when the napa cabbage is not in season
  • Its crunchiness and the sweetness make wonderful tasting kimchi
  • Besides, this green cabbage kimchi is whole lot simpler to make than the traditional cabbage kimchi

How to Make Napa Cabbage Kimchi

Daewonfood.com DA: 18 PA: 37 MOZ Rank: 78

Makes 1 quart What You Need Ingredients 1 medium head (2 pounds) napa cabbage 1/4 cup sea salt or kosher salt (see Recipe Notes) Water (see Recipe Notes) 1 tablespoon grated garlic (5 to 6 cloves) 1 teaspoon grated ginger 1 teaspoon sugar 2 to 3 tablepoons seafood flavor or water (optional, see Recipe Notes) 1 to 5 tablespoons Korean red pepper flakes (gochugaru) 8 ounces Korean radish …

Baechu Kimchi (Napa Cabbage Kimchi) Recipe by Angela Carlos

  • Napa cabbage: The granddaddy of all kimchi
  • This is the kimchi that people think of when they hear the word kimchi—from taco topper to the cooler case at Ralph’s
  • There are literally thousands of different kimchi recipes and combinations, tied to the seasons
  • That said, this recipe is special.Traditionally, napa kimchi

Choi's Napa Cabbage Kimchi Recipe MyRecipes

Myrecipes.com DA: 17 PA: 33 MOZ Rank: 75

  • Cut out and discard core at base of each quarter, then slice cabbage crosswise into 2 1/2-in
  • Put cabbage in a large bowl, cover with water, and let sit for …

Napa Cabbage Recipes Allrecipes

Allrecipes.com DA: 18 PA: 50 MOZ Rank: 94

Tender napa cabbage stars in over 30 trusted recipes for stir-fry noodles, napa cabbage salad, napa cabbage slaw, kimchi, potstickers, cabbage soup, and more.

Green Cabbage Kimchi (양배추 김치 Yangbaechu Kimchi)

Kimchimari.com DA: 14 PA: 22 MOZ Rank: 63

  • Green Cabbage (the regular kind used to make coleslaw) kimchi appeared pretty recently in the Korean food scene, probably because many Koreans who lived outside of Korea could not get any authentic Korean Cabbage (Celery Cabbage is the exact one but Napa Cabbage is very close)
  • I first tasted cabbage kimchi

Recipe: Napa Cabbage Kimchi — FarmSteady

Farmsteady.com DA: 14 PA: 39 MOZ Rank: 81

  • Recipe: Napa Cabbage Kimchi While Kimchi can be made from any vegetable (and is), it’s likely what you first came across is baechu kimchi
  • It’s the funky, red-hot, napa cabbage and daikon radish version faithfully served up alongside nearly all Korean meals and worked into burgers, fried chicken sandwiches, tacos and all sorts of kimchi

Napa Cabbage Kimchi (Poggi Kimchi) Roti n Rice

Rotinrice.com DA: 17 PA: 47 MOZ Rank: 93

  • Prepare the sauce by combining all the sauce ingredients and glutinous rice paste (from Step 3) in a large bowl
  • Add radish, chives, and green onions
  • Place one of the cabbage quarters on a plate
  • Spread sauce mixture between each leaf and around the cabbage
  • Repeat with the the other three cabbage

Recipe 0017 Napa Cabbage Kimchi KayeChen Kitchen

Youtube.com DA: 15 PA: 6 MOZ Rank: 51

I learned to eat kimchi back when I was 12 when I met Korean students who joined voluntarily in a program for helping organizations and sharing school equipm


For the Selective Snackhound

Pacific Northwest Kale Chips

Portland, OR: What happens when the satisfying crunch of potato chips meets the nutritional profile of raw greens? Pacific Northwest Kale Chips, or, as co-founder Sarah Pool puts it, the “holy grail” of snack foods.

Portland, OR: Movie night just got a lot more interesting. Masala Pop offers us a way to enjoy the rich, complex flavors of Indian food on our America’s favorite corn-based snack. Plus, it’s all-natural, fiber-rich, and gluten-free.

Picky Bars

Bend, OR: Do you need an on-the-go breakfast or snack that fills you up, fuels you, and is made of real food? Picky you! Luckily, the great minds at Picky Bars have converged to give you just that.

Blackbird Food Co. Granola

Portland, OR: Granola has long enjoyed a reputation as a “hippie” food, but can it be elevated to the status of “foodie?” Blackbird Food Co. would emphatically answer, yes! Its power-packed granolas are full of super foods and unexpected flavor combinations for the discerning palate.


Monday, December 11, 2017

Farm Bulletin: Oregon’s Aci Sivri Cayennes

Nothing at Ayers Creek Farm is unconsidered, from the wetland to the predatory birds to the varieties of pole beans. Neither are things precious—if a crop doesn't produce or too many other farms begin offering a similar product or it's too much trouble, out it goes. And that includes au courant terms like "heirloom" and "artisan" (seriously, don't bring it up), which is addressed in this essay on the cayenne pepper that Anthony and Carol Boutard have been working diligently for years to perfect to their specifications.

Oregon’s Aci Sivri is a cayenne introduced from Turkey in the 1980s. The Turkish name aci sivri biber simply means a hot long (cayenne-type) pepper, rather than a specific variety. Turkey produces a lot of peppers, cayennes and sweet, about 7% of the world’s production, ranking second to China. Peppers are grown in the Mediterranean, Aegean and Black Sea regions of the country. In Turkey, cayennes are used both pickled when green and dried when ripe.

Capsicum calyxes, from left: Oregon’s Aci Sivri, Costeño Rojo, Chiltepec, Joe’s Long Cayenne, Shishito, Italian sweet

It is fashionable to tag the honorific “heirloom” on all manner of crop varieties, and aci sivri hasn’t been spared. As any crop grown for more than 25 years meets the definition regardless of quality, the term is well nigh meaningless. Some up the ante by describing the pepper as a "centuries old Turkish heirloom." Given the generic name and the absence of a geographic link, that embellishment is a stretch. As a result of the Turkish diaspora, people of Turkish descent live in Spain, Italy, Germany, the United States and elsewhere. Just as an Oregonian returned with some seeds of a cayenne that impressed him from his time in Turkey, seeds travel in both directions and it is just as likely that seeds from a fine cayenne, perhaps sent by a Cornell graduate student to her family, found their way from Upstate New York to a Black Sea village in Turkey where it was welcomed. Over the past five centuries, seeds have been an international commodity, passed around by researchers and seed companies, as well as families. The idea of a crop frozen in time like an antique tea cup or souvenir spoon is a fatuous conceit.

The berries of the Nightshade family, the Solanaceae, have marvelous calyxes (above left). The eggplant has a large, tough, often thorny one, the tomatillo’s papery calyx continues to grow after pollination and envelopes the fruit (below right), while the tomato has a wiry, glandular and reflexed version. The calyxes of peppers are akin to hats, varying in size and shape, and are part of the fruit’s genetic fingerprint. The calyx of Oregon’s Aci Sivri forms a distinctive hat that extends beyond and over the fruit, worn jauntily like a French beret. Very different from the long cayennes that sport a tight calyx over the ears like a flapper’s cloche, or others that have merest of beanies. Or the bell pepper with a calyx that is proportionately similar to a yarmulke. And to think, before this digression you all probably never gave a second thought to the Solanaceous calyx and all its forms.

Not all peppers sold as "Aci Sivri" by seed companies or in photos posted as aci sivri biber have the beret-like calyx possessed by Oregon’s version. Many have the flapper's cloche or a beanie instead. This observation confirms our observation that aci sivri biber is not a well-defined variety, but rather a general cayenne type with a lot of diversity. For example, some catalogue entries suggest that the heat of the pepper is variable and can be very hot. Others describe the pepper as exceeding eight inches long, or producing an astounding 50 fruits per plant. Undoubtedly, others have brought to the United States a Turkish pepper called aci sivri. The descriptions and photos suggest they are very different peppers from Oregon’s.

Under its jaunty calyx, Oregon’s Aci Sivri is well-defined in terms of quality. It has a sweet flavor with a rich chocolate-like complexity. The heat is consistently gentle if the interior ribs, the placental tissue, are removed. You can be generous in its use and the whole family can enjoy its flavor. The pepper is a bit more frisky when the ribs are retained. Even then, the heat is civilized it doesn’t slap you in the face or cause torment in its descent down the gullet. Although the Scoville scale treats the "heat" of peppers as a linear phenomenon, it is not. The heat comes from capsaicin and at least 10 other very similar compounds called capsaicinoids. Variations in the quantities of each of these compounds will alter the intensity and character of the heat. In Oregon’s Aci Sivri, the character of the capsaicinoid blend is amiable.

Joe's Long cayennes in the field at Ayers Creek with their cloche-like calyxes.

Unlike souvenir spoons and antique tea cups whose traits remain static through time, crops evolve and adapt to their new home. Oregon’s Aci Sivri has been here for three decades and is clearly now an American of Turkish descent. (And it is also officially an Oregon heirloom, having met the mere 25-year hurdle for that banal and meaningless honorific.) We have had a hand in shaping the pepper in our own seed production. Of particular importance for us are the plant’s architecture, early ripening and the darkest red fruits. In terms of architecture, we have been selecting for plants that hold their fruits aloft of the ground rather than having the fruits dragging about on the soil. Good posture is critical where the late summer is often wet. It means the fruits remain clean and do not rot at the tip as wet weather approaches in early autumn. Good quality peppers are more important to us than high yield, and those that ripen during the warmer days of September have better flavor. We look for plants that are modest in their productivity. In our experience, the darker fruits have a more complex flavor when dry.

One of the advantages of being a farmer-breeder, we can be fussy and every year select ten or so perfect specimens for seed from a field of over 500 plants. The fruits for seed are the first we harvest. If we were growing the plants for seed only, we could never be as selective. And we wouldn’t be so concerned about plants that have their fruits slouch on the soil, a bit tardy or never get quite as red as the others. We could change the pepper’s name as is our wont, but Aci Sivri has a nice ring to it and we have no better idea, so we are content to add the possessive modifier and leave it at that.

There is a wonderful moment in one of Chekhov’s short stories where an officer greets his lover after a few drinks with his colleagues. She savors the warm bite of the pertsovka—pepper vodka—as he greets her with a kiss. When we first tasted Oregon’s Aci Sivri, the scene came to mind immediately and made sense. In the story, the pepper was amorous not aggressive. Hvorostovsky not Putin. Anthony sat down in Powell’s one day determined to find that short story. He was soon stymied by the sheer volume of Chekhov's short stories, compounded by the multitude of collections and translations after an hour, he left cross-eyed. Upon reflection, it is better to retain the memory of the gentle bite of a pertsovka-infused kiss without a plot’s unnecessary complications or disappointments.


Watch the video: Traditional kimchi recipe Tongbaechu-kimchi: 통배추김치 (June 2022).


Comments:

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